Don’t Miss Thursdays with CLA: June 18th at 12/Noon

Tune in to “Thursdays with CLA” on Thursday, June 18 at Noon at http://clareimagine.com/!

Join CLA President with special guest California State Librarian Greg Lucas in a no-holds barred conversation on how things are going with our State Librarian.

Robert will be asking Greg what he feels his proudest accomplishments are after one year on the job, some of his unexpected/unforeseen challenges, his vision for libraries in California moving forward, what he *really* thinks about library school, and most important, what song he will be performing at the CLA conference in November (in connection with our Million Reader Challenge.) Plus you will have the opportunity to tweet your questions to Greg @ #CLAReimagine. This one should get interesting…

http://clareimagine.com/

And in case you missed them, previous Thursdays with CLA editions are worth watching:

Enjoy!

Don’t Miss Thursdays with CLA! Special Guest Justin Hoenke on 5/14 at 12/Noon

Is reference dead? Is it something that we still do but now has a new name? Join CLA President Robert Karatsu in a conversation with Justin Hoenke, a co-author of the recent ALA publication Reinventing Reference: How Libraries Delivery Value in the Age of Google as they discuss what reference looks like in today’s public library. Prior to his conversation with Justin, Robert will talk a little about the Reference Service Press Fellowship, a scholarship that thanks to Dr. Gail Schlachter and the Reference Service Press has been awarded annually by CLA since 1993

Go to http://clareimagine.com/ on Thursday, the 14th at 12/Noon.

And in case you missed them, previous Thursdays with CLA editions are worth watching:

Enjoy!

Don’t Miss Thursdays with CLA: March 12th at 12/Noon

Join CLA President Robert Karatsu in a conversation with the iconic director of the San Diego County Library system Jose Aponte as they discuss “What is Leadership?” Both Jose and Robert have led highly successful organizations (San Diego County Library won Library Journal’s 2012 “Library of the Year” and in 2013, while Robert was the director of the Rancho Cucamonga Public Library, they won the 2013 National Medal for Museum and Library Service) but two more seemingly different people you will not meet. Listen in to hear what they have in common, and how they define that most elusive term “leadership”. And as an added bonus, Robert will also be asking as many library directors as possible who are meeting at the upcoming Public Library Director’s Forum to give a *one* sentence definition of “leadership”. Hear what they all have to say at this “Thursday with CLA”!

Go to http://clareimagine.com/ on Thursday, the 12th at 12/Noon.

And in case you missed them, previous Thursdays with CLA editions are worth watching:

Enjoy!

Don’t Miss Thursdays with CLA: February 19th at 12/Noon

Join CLA President Robert Karatsu as he first gives an overview of the 2015 CLA “Spring Fling” programs. The “Spring Flings” are continuing education programs sponsored (and produced) by CLA’s different interest groups. This year, the Technical Services, Management, Youth Services, Technology, Collection Development and Student Interest Groups are all going to do at least one program. Find out more when you tune in! Also, Robert will give an update on the Weed Community Library and talk to the people who organized the crowdfunding campaign that successfully reached its financial goal. (Robert is of the opinion that crowdfunding really is the future of public fundraising so if you are not familiar with how it works, or how to set up a campaign, tune in to learn more!).

Go to http://clareimagine.com/ on Thursday, the 19th at 12/Noon.

And in case you missed them, previous Thursdays with CLA editions are worth watching:

Enjoy!

American news habits and information needs

A week ago, during a multi-organization meeting about how public libraries play a role in connecting federal and state policy information to the community members in need of the real scoop, the topic of broadband access was teased out in a couple salient directions. One I found particularly wanting further discussion is how disconnected a community can become from changing government directions (think the Covered California insurance marketplace as an example) when its online access is limited to public computers? It’s not that skills like using a mouse or email continue to lack penetration; instead, what hasn’t bloomed in such circumstances is the habit of staying informed around civic engagement concerns.

How do we, as information specialists–and civil servants, help community members build the skills and the habits which constant news updating require of anyone participating in our culture?

Joachim Scopfel, Director of the Atelier National de Reproduction des Thèses, Charles de Gaulle University (France), has published an infographic that gives us not only numbers related to how Americans share news, but also points up the very venues for news that may not, after all, be all that available to all Americans. And even when technical availability exists, are community members engaging the most efficient methods for accessing policy updates? The research shows a continuing reliance on email over social media, as the online channel for updates. As with all correspondence, email brings with it the requirement that the recipient evaluate the authority of the sender: is the news included reliable, timely, and appropriate to the recipient’s own situation? On the other hand, a direct Twitter feed, from, in this example, Covered California, guarantees the authority and timeliness, while each message’s design should allow the reader to be able to judge quickly whether it pertains to her situation.

As information guides, can we boost community access to what’s official, help direct community members’ attention to how they, impacted as they know they are by government policy and policy changes, can take control over keeping abreast of those policy news bits, bites and bytes that affect them? What does tech access education look like in libraries offering the news skills needed as we approach the first quarter point of the 21st century?