November Webinars

Looking for practical & free learning that you can participate in right at your desk? Please join us for one, two, three, or all four of these webinars in November!

Libraries and the people working in them help in so many ways. Join us for these  upcoming webinars and discover useful resources and strategies.

citizenship

Thursday – November 1, 2018
“Free Online U.S. Citizenship Course” Does your library provide support to adult immigrants who want to pursue U.S. citizenship and need help studying for the naturalization interview? USA Learns Citizenship is a free course that helps immigrants prepare for all aspects of the naturalization interview. Learn how your library can use the course to help immigrants prepare for their citizenship test.For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=799&reset=1.

esl

Wednesday – November 14, 2018
“Free Online English as a Second Language Courses”
Is your library looking for ways to help people learn beginning and intermediate English as a second language (ESL)? USA Learns has three ESL courses that incorporate video lessons and thousands of learning activities to teach English in an effective and interactive way. Learn how your library can utilize the courses to help immigrants improve basic language skills.For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=800&reset=1.

meaningful workThursday – Nov 15, 2018 “Encore Career Search Strategies: Help Your Patrons Find Their Way to Meaningful Work”
As library staff it can be very rewarding to help your patrons on the challenging path of (re)entering the job market as a “mature worker.” We can help older patrons compete successfully for jobs by steering them toward resources that match their needs, and by helping them find (economical) ways to develop new job search skill. This webinar will give you information and resources to help patrons bridge the gap in knowledge and skills. For a complete description and to register go to: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=805&reset=1.

writeWednesday – Nov 28, 2018 “How to Write More Effective Email and Web Content”
Communication connects us to one another and is at the heart of everything we do. In this webinar, we’ll offer specific guidelines that will help you communicate more effectively in an age in which we read most of our content on a screen. We’ll look at before and after examples, and attendees will receive a list of resources for learning more. For a complete description and to register go to: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=798&reset=1.


Webinars are free of charge. Pre-register by clicking on the Register Now button on the announcement page. If you pre-register, you will receive an email with the login link and a reminder email the day before the event. If you are unable to attend a live event, you can access the recorded version the day following the webinar. Check out our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived.

Building a Culture that Supports Learning

Here at Infopeople, we’re 100% focused on providing continuing education and professional development opportunities for library staff. It’s what we do! Every year we offer hundreds of training events for more than 5,000 people. We regularly and routinely ask those 5000 people for feedback regarding our courses, but we also ask them for feedback and insights about overall learning and training needs in libraries. It’s a huge opportunity for us to learn about workplace learning and what works… and what doesn’t.

Over the years we’ve noticed something interesting. On one side, we hear from library staff who wish for more support for their learning. We also hear from library administrators who wish they knew how to motivate their staff to prioritize learning. Ultimately, everyone wants the same thing. It’s based in awareness that our learning and growth will result in our ability to better serve the ever-changing needs in our communities. It’s important!

manager-staff

Learning is at the heart of what libraries do, yet we don’t always prioritize our own learning. Meaningful learning in a library is more than a single course or a single person. It’s a culture. That’s why Infopeople is excited to be developing a new initiative called Building an Effective Learning Culture. This 3-minute video describes what we mean by “learning culture”.

video

We’re trying some exciting new things with this program:

  • Unlike the typical online course, participants will register in teams from a single library or library system, and will do work individually and in groups.
  • It will include virtual mentoring.
  • It will focus on new delivery methods that are divided into bite-sized chunks.

This pilot initiative will launch in January and run through June of 2017. Application materials will be available soon. Interested in learning more? You can stay current with this new initiative by filling out this form to join our mailing list. You can also register to attend a webinar we’re hosting on November 1st, which will talk more about this important topic and how your library can get involved in the initiative.

ilovelearning

Emerging Tech Trends in Libraries

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Keeping up with technology can be a challenge! To help, we’ve hosted four webinars over the last several months featuring tech gurus Laura Solomon and David Lee King discussing emerging technology trends and how those trends are impacting library services.

Laura kicked off the series with the first webinar in December 2015. David followed-up with the second webinar in February 2016. David also presented the third webinar in March and then Laura finished up the series with the fourth webinar in June. Each session is one-hour long and is FREE for you to access.

School is out for summer, but you can be doing a whole lot of technology learning if you check these recorded sessions out now.

#librarylearning   #keepingup   #librarytechnology

Learners have come a long way with tech developments

For the past decade, Infopeople has offered a course for all library types and staff classifications on Weeding for Your Library’s Health. More accurately, we’ve offered an ever evolving course addressing this topic and, for me as its decade-long instructor, the evolution is apparent in the participants as well as the format and coverage.

Weeding in libraries calls up all manner of political and emotional red flags, as Boston Public Library most recently demonstrates in national news. Second guessing Any Library’s weeding makes Monday (or Tuesday) morning quarterbacking look useful. Instead of going into all that, what I want to do is share  what the decade shows in terms of Infopeople learner participation.

The first dozen iterations of this workshop were day-long on-ground offerings. Workshop attendees did represent a variety of library types (including private as well as public, school, and academic) and each group shared a general geographic location–which is to say that the collective wisdom in the room tended to be, well, local. And since these were on-ground workshops in which we were all together for one day only and parked in a meeting room, the “hands on” exercises necessarily involved whatever I had toted into that room, or the host library had on offer from recently already-weeded stores. (TSA used to leave very interesting notes in my weeding workshop luggage). Then, at the end of the day, everyone went home, and the next day went back to his or her library and either weeded…or didn’t.

The course moved online even before Infopeople online course moved to Moodle. Online courses were a new experience for lots of library staff. They struggled with posting assignments on top of struggling with weeding. But it was immediately apparent that an online course, unfolding over weeks, was a lot more effective in terms of learning and doing weeding! Participants were in their own locations. The assignments had them working with their own weeding issues on location.

As the years passed, the location diversity among online course participants ramped way up. Now a course complement included diverse library types, diverse classifications, and geographic diversity. Participants began to find support and weeding allies a thousand miles away, while still being able to practice what they were learning right where they needed it to be happening–in their home libraries.

And participants have become increasingly comfortable with online learning, a capacity development which makes everyone’s course experience richer. Forum posts are increasingly substantive, a higher and higher percentage of those who register are active on a frequent basis throughout the course, and questions and suggestions fly between 50+ points of contact instead of within a table group of two or three.

Weeding is never going to be the library world’s favorite task. But every time I spend a month with a new group of participants willing to learn more about weeding well, I come away impressed by how far online learning capacity grows among library staff, well, everywhere.

Public libraries, the Affordable Care Act, and news in 2014

With the initial healthcare insurance enrollment period, and the attendant media running up to and during those months, just fading in memory, it’s already time to use what we learned and improve on the remarkably smooth Covered California/California public library interfaces we began to build a year ago. WebJunction has been pursuing the study and documentation of public library processes and lessons in various states. Reading their report on the California experience offers insights on what worked here and why.

The second open health insurance enrollment period is scheduled to begin November 15. The Affordable Care Act includes many directives besides this particular and complex one. Now is a good time to review the various aspects beyond insurance coverage that might be affecting your community and be prime to target by library staff as local information development needs.

This year at CLA, a program featuring Covered California, the community aware staff at Alameda County Library who gave a star performance connecting community to Affordable Care access and information the first year out, and Infopeople, which continues to update and provide free access to the independent online series Affordable Care Act @ Your California Public Library, is slated for Sunday afternoon.

Do you have programming experiences around Affordable Care you’d like to share? As WebJunction notes in its report, our collaborative capacity is a California library strength.