Library Programming for Adults

During the summer, lots of time, energy and attention are given to the amazing summer programs that public libraries offer for youth. This post, however, is for all of the library staff who coordinate library programming for adults. You deserve recognition and support, too! Whether you’re conducting a Summer Reading Program for Adults or offering other programming designed to inform, educate,  and connect the adults in your community, you’re doing creative and inspiring work. We have scheduled two webinars for you this summer. Both are free and both are focused on sharing ideas regarding library programs for adults. After all, you don’t stop liking science and crafts just because the world sees you as a grown-up.

June 12, 2019

Community Climate Cafes: Science Programming for Adults

Start Time: Pacific – 12 Noon, Mountain – 1 PM, Central – 2 PM, Eastern – 3 PM

scienceJoin Sarah Kishler and Michele Rowic from San Jose Public Library and learn about their three-part series of adult programs on the subject of climate change and the impact it had on the community. Part book club and part science café, the program incorporated companion books, short film showings, guest speakers, giveaways, and community discussion. Sarah and Michele will discuss the program structure, themes, as well as outcomes, challenges and scalability. There will be a discussion of community partnerships, promotion and marketing as well as a demonstration of the Pushing the Limits Environmental Literacy materials, which are available (FREE!) via Infopeople’s Niche Academy. Info/registration at: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=853.

July 11, 2019

Living in a Material World: Crafting Programs for Adults

Start Time: Pacific – 12 Noon, Mountain – 1 PM, Central – 2 PM, Eastern – 3 PM

craftsIn this session, Kimberli Buckli from Contra Costa County Library will discuss how to put together an adult craft program on a budget. She will offer a wide variety and range of craft examples that will prove that crafts aren’t just for kids. Additionally, Kimberli will discuss the history of crafts and the current state of the crafting world as well as the therapeutic and health benefits that crafts can provide for adults. Info/registration at: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=852.

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Infopeople webinars are free of charge. You can pre-register by clicking on the Register Now button on the announcement page. If you pre-register, then you will receive an email with login link and a reminder email the day before the event. If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar. Check out our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived.

Library Podcasts

what is a podcastWe’re approaching summer and for many of us that means vacation time- and sometimes… road trips! If you’re like me, one of the best things about those highway hours is listening to podcasts. I’ve been known to spend a fair chunk of time curating just the right options for a family journey. And I know I’m not alone in my podcast fandom. Their popularity continues to steadily increase. According to the 2018 Infinite Dial Study by Edison Research and Triton Digital, 44% of Americans (age 12 and over) say they have listened to a podcast.

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Libraries not only help people find relevant podcasts, but they can use podcasts for engagement with their communities, too. In her upcoming Infopeople course about Community Engagement, instructor Barbara Alvarez suggests there are countless opportunities for libraries to create podcast series.

Some of her ideas include:

  • Storytelling with community members
    Partner with local historical societies or genealogy groups to interview and record stories from community members, including senior citizens, about memorable occurrences in the community.
  • Entrepreneurs
    Host an entrepreneur series in which you interview local business owners who decided to become their own boss. Ask about their story, what their recommendations are for people who would like to follow in their footsteps, and what the future is for entrepreneurship. (Take a look at an entrepreneur podcast series Barbara created as a Business Librarian).
  • Booktalks
    Encourage local organizations, businesses, and community members to participate in a monthly booktalk podcast in which you discuss a book (or movie or topic), and get a local expert’s (business owner or organization) input into how that theme relates to the community as a whole. (Barbara’s library hosts a monthly book discussion and has a blast doing it! Listen to their episodes).
  • Informational Interviews.
    Curious about a certain field, profession, topic, or theme? Create a podcast series exploring oddities, curiosities, and unknown people, places, and things in your community. (Barbara and a colleague hosted an informational series as part of the virtual conference called The Library OnConference. Listen here.)
  • Local happenings
    Partner with the Park District, Chamber of Commerce, local government, schools, etc. to talk about exciting events going on in the community, and how people can get involved. Interview community members about their participation, too.
  • Creative communities
    Use the podcast as a platform for local writers and creatives to share their poems, songs, stories, and more. Think of it as an “open mic night” on air.
  • Armchair travel
    If there are patrons at your library who enjoy traveling, ask if they are willing to share their experiences so fellow members of the community can travel from the comfort of their home.
  • Job seeker series
    Support the local job seeking network by partnering with job seeker programs or organizations to share best practices, tips and resources that job seekers can utilize during their career transition. This is also a great opportunity to highlight library resources and tools.

Did those examples get your creative juices flowing? We hope so! Using technology for community engagement is all about building new or stronger community relationships using virtual technology, spreading the library’s and the community’s message to a larger audience, particularly those who are unfamiliar with library and community resources, and showcasing aspects of the library and the community that may be overlooked or unknown.

And there’s more good news… you do not need fancy software or expensive equipment to create a podcast series. You can use your smartphone or tablet and free software!

Does your library create podcasts? Can you think of a potential podcast series for your library and community?

In Community Engagement: Building Connections with Technology, Barbara walks learners through process of creating podcasts and videos, too. She also helps learners discover how to broadcast live events, making it possible to share library events virtually. Additional information and registration are available at: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=843.

Make a Plan for Learning

What will you learn in 2017? Have you set any professional learning goals? Plan On Monitor Shows Expectations

Creating a learning plan is something an individual, a team, or a community of practice can do. It is a way of communicating intentions and identifying action steps to be taken to achieve your learning goals. Achieving learning goals can make your work life more satisfying and it can ultimately lead to improved library services.

There are many different approaches to creating a learning plan, but this article will overview a simple three step process that may work for you.

  1. Reflect: What did you do in 2016? What did you learn? What changed in your community, organization, and department or with your position? Think more broadly, too, and also consider… How has the field changed? What new technologies, trends, or opportunities have you not yet explored? Consider these questions and critically think about your workplace performance and consider areas for growth. It may be useful to solicit input from peers or supervisors who are familiar with your job performance, too.
  2. Set Goals: Based upon your reflection, identify things you want or need to learn. Start by creating a long list of possibilities and then establish priorities. Looking at the strategic goals for your library, organization or community can help you determine the learning priorities that are most relevant. Discussions with your supervisor can also be key as you narrow down your list of learning possibilities. From your list, select 3-5 learning goals. Try to set goals that are ambitious, yet realistic.
  3. Identify Actions: For each goal, create an action plan. How will you achieve each learning goal? Will you take a course? Attend a webinar?  If so, we can help!
    • Infopeople’s Planned Training Calendar can help you identify learning opportunities.
    • If you want to receive email notices as courses and webinars are scheduled, you can sign up for the Infopeople training announcement list.
    • Having trouble finding a course or webinar that addresses your learning goals? Please use this form to make a training suggestion.
    • It’s critical that learning not stop at the end of the training. Applying what you have learned in your workplace is a vital action step to include in your plan. Infopeople training always emphasizes practical application.

Ready to start learning with us? Here are a few of our upcoming courses and webinars!

Online Courses (4 weeks, unless otherwise noted)
  • After School and Out-of-School Programming – Instructor: Lisa Shaia
  • Adult Literacy Programs – Instructor: Jane Salisbury
  • Technology Planning – Instructor: Diana Silveira
  • Widgets and Tweaks: Tools for spicing up old websites and blogs (2 week course) – Instructor: Rita Gavelis
  • Introduction to Library Management – Instructor: Anne Cain
  • Serving People with Mental Illness at Your Library – Instructor: Josh Berk
  • Developing Effective Library Partnerships – Instructor: Catherine Hakala-Ausperk
  • Beyond Cataloging: RDA – Instructor: Emily Nimsakont
  • Emotional Intelligence (Part 1) – Instructor: Catherine McHugh
  • Programs for Emerging Adults – Instructor: Audrey Barbakoff
  • All Work is Team Work (LSSC) – Instructor: Cheryl Gould
  • Customer Service Challenges- Instructor: Mary Ross
  • Supervisory Success – Instructor: Sarah Flowers
  • Staying on Top of Technology – Instructor: David Lee King
  • Re-Defining Safe at Work – Instructor: Catherine Hakala-Ausperk
Webinars (1 hour)
  • Historypin: Connecting Communities with Local History – Presenter(s): Kerry Young
  • What’s New in Children’s Literature 2017 – Presenter(s): Penny Peck
  • Informational Books for Storytime – Presenter(s): Penny Peck
  • What’s New in Young Adult Literature 2017 – Presenter(s): Michael Cart

If you would like to receive email notices as registration for these courses and webinars opens, please sign up for the Infopeople training announcement list.

Libraries Seeking Solutions and Serving Communities

Arsolutionse you seeking solutions? If you look at Infopeople’s planned training calendar for 2016/2017, you will see a number of learning opportunities for those seeking to address important challenges in their libraries and communities.

Make a plan for learning! We encourage you to review the options and to make a plan for learning. Which 4-week courses or 1-hour webinars address the topics that are a priority for you? Consider divvying up topics among staff members and then sharing what you learn with one another. To be alerted when registration opens for these options, subscribe to the IFPTraining email list.

November 2016: Active Shooter Policies for Libraries

In this one-hour webinar, participants will learn what an active shooter situation is and how to respond (run, hide, fight). Active shooter policies will be covered, including emergency/disaster, communication, and evacuation plans. Best practices for training library staff will also be included.

Instructor: Mary Soucie is the State Librarian of North Dakota. The North Dakota State Library was one of the first state agencies in North Dakota to write active shooter procedures, with assistance from the ND Highway Patrol.

January 2017: Social Services in the Library

In this one-hour webinar, participants will hear from Elissa Hardy, a social worker working in the Denver Public Library. Denver City Librarian Michelle Jeske said the position is focused on the following outcomes, “To connect people who are at risk with services they need, remove barriers, and we want to do that while making the library a safer, more comfortable place for everyone.”

Instructor: Elissa Hardy, a social worker, is the community resource specialist at the Denver Public Library. In this role, she is making an impact in a way that’s helping many library patrons and also her coworkers.

February 2017: Libraries Services for Patrons Experiencing Homelessness

In this four-week course, participants will learn to provide meaningful library services to library patrons experiencing homelessness. Are you concerned about how to balance the needs of all your library users? Do you find yourself questioning the rules and policies of your library related to those experiencing homelessness but aren’t sure how to create good alternatives? Using real life examples, this course will provide you with the tools you need to navigate the world of services to people experiencing homelessness, helping you figure out your library’s place in that world.

Instructor: As a librarian, Julie Ann Winkelstein worked in a range of positions, from jails and prison librarian to Family Literacy coordinator to children’s and young adult librarian. In 2012 she received her PhD in Communication and Information from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where her research topic was homeless lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) and public libraries. Since 2008 she has taught online and face-to-face undergraduate and graduate courses in children’s and young adult literature, as well as courses in race and gender.

April 2017: Serving People with Mental Illness at Your Library

In this four-week course, the instructor will share a practical, compassionate and understanding approach to the delivery of library services to patrons who have a mental illness. Gain the information and tools needed to better understand mental illnesses. Look at examples of the challenges faced by libraries and their patrons, and learn from the exemplary approach some libraries are taking as they seek to meet the challenges.

Instructor: Josh Berk is the Executive Director of the Bethlehem (PA) Area Public Library. He is actively involved in mental health training in public libraries. He is also the author of four books for children and young adults.

May 2017: Customer Service Challenges

In this four-week course, participants will develop an understanding of and skills to deal with a range of difficult behaviors from merely annoying to potentially harmful. Prevention and proactive approaches will be shared. Library policies and procedures will be covered. Special issues related to safety in small or minimally-staffed libraries will be included.

Instructor: Mary Ross has over 25 years of experience working in public libraries as a children’s and adult services librarian and as a branch manager. She managed the staff training and development program at the Seattle Public Library for eight years. While working at Seattle Public Library she implemented a training program for all staff on dealing with difficult patron behavior. She has helped hundreds of library staff members learn how to safely manage difficult and disruptive patron behavior.

June 2017: Re-Defining Safe at Work

In this four-week course, participants will explore how libraries can develop safe and respectful service environments and workplace cultures. Policies and procedures, job descriptions and performance expectations, behavior and discipline rules, and safety guidelines will be covered. Participants will be encouraged to look at the current conditions in their library – including signage, bathrooms, and parking lots – to assess and make plans for improvement. Everyone, from administrators to staff to customers, can contribute to creating a safe and respectful environment.

Instructor: Catherine Hakala-Ausperk is a 31-year Ohio public library veteran, with experience in everything from direct customer service to management and administration. She is the author of several books including Be a Great Boss, Build a Great Team, and Renew Yourself! A Six-Step Plan for More Meaningful Work.

Youth Services: Upcoming Learning Opportunities

Do you work in Library Youth Services? Infopeople has a number of upcoming training opportunities that may be of interest to you!

Age Range: Under 5 years old

Creating Baby Spaces in Public Libraries: Designing for Success 3-baby
1-hour webinar on Jan 27 with presenter Bridget Alexander

Sensory-Enhanced Storytimes
1-hour webinar on Feb 11 with presenters Laura Baldassari-Hackstaff and Laura Olson

Age Range: 5 – 12 years old

Children’s Programming on a Budget
4-week course with instructor Penny Peck  play colors
Free or low-cost library programs are a natural and effective way to meet the needs of school-age children and their parents or caregivers in your community. Your library’s programming efforts could include multicultural events, do-it-yourself craft and game programs, book-related movies, Lego clubs, board and electronic gaming programs, book discussion groups, Makerspace programs, storytelling, puppet shows, and “dog buddy” reading programs.  In this course, expert children’s librarian Penny Peck shares her practical experiences with determining, developing, and delivering programs that stimulate and engage children – all for a reasonable cost to your library.

Age Range: 12 – 18 years old

Adapting Informal Learning Practices for Teen Services: the labs @ Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
1-hour webinar on Feb 24 with presenter Corey Wittig

STEM and STEAM Programming for Teens in Libraries
1-hour webinar on Jan 21 with presenter Karen Jensen   youngpeople
Jensen will discuss the basic concepts behind both STEM and STEAM programming. We’ll also discuss the benefits for both libraries and the teens they serve. We’ll also provide you with some basic program starting points for STEAM programs that involve art, music and/or books.

Teen Services Fundamentals
4-week course with instructor Sarah Flowers
You’ll come away from the course with an understanding of the developmental needs of teens in our diverse society and tools to identify and enhance the library’s role in meeting those needs. This course will enable you to advocate for teens and for library services geared specifically to them.