Join us for these February webinars!

twitter instagramFree Tools for Working with Social Media 

Presented by Laura Solomon

Wednesday February 5, 2020

Do you spend a good part of your job working with social media? If so, then you already know how time-intensive content creation and management of social platforms can be. Fortunately, the web is filled with free tools vying for your attention. In this webinar you will learn about some online gems that you can use to improve your workflow, create new content, or share with your friends and colleagues. The webinar will include tools for working with Twitter and Instagram, tools for creating social media content for varied platforms, and other free online tools. For a complete description and to REGISTER NOW: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=887&reset=1

What’s New in Children’s Literature 2020

Presented by Penny Peck

Wednesday February 19, 2020

Join us for our annual review of what’s new in children’s literature, including books that reflect the diversity of the children we serve. Hear about

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books published in late 2019 and Spring 2020 that will be popular with children ages 0-12. We’ll cover board books, picture books, easy readers, transitional fiction, genre fiction for middle grades, graphic novels, poetry, nonfiction, and more.  Find new books perfect for storytime and to offer parents as read-alouds. Discover books that will grab the attention of reluctant readers, including the newest graphic novels for kids and popular series. Take away a list of helpful websites to use when doing readers’ advisory, and sites that will help you keep up-to-date on the latest children’s books. For a complete description and to REGISTER NOW: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=886&reset=1

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Infopeople’s webinars are free of charge! You can pre-register by clicking on the Register Now button on the announcement page. If you pre-register, then you will receive an email with login link and a reminder email the day before the event. If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day after the webinar.  Check our archive listing at:  http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

What’s Your Tech Personality?

When it comes to new technologies, are you mainly a visionary or an implementer? Find out by taking this quiz. Tell us your results in the comments!

tech_personality_quiz

Nicole Hennig created this short personality quiz as a fun way to get us thinking about what skills, talents, and temperaments are useful for technology work in libraries. It’s not scientific — just a fun way to get us thinking.

In her upcoming Infopeople course, Nicole and course participants will look at two roles or types of people, visionaries and implementers, in more depth. The course will include strategies for each type.  Course participants will also learn the best methods and strategies for tracking technology trends, the best resources for keeping up, how to evaluate what you’ve learned, the importance of experimenting with new technologies, and how to plan for implementation of new technologies that meet your users’ needs. It’s going to be a fun and useful course! Interested in learning more about Emerging Technologies? Registration and details are at: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=868.

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Course instructor Nicole Hennig is an expert in mobile technologies for libraries. In her 14 years of experience at the MIT Libraries (as webmaster and head of user experience), she won awards for innovation and worked to keep academics up to date with the best mobile technologies. Now she has her own business helping librarians stay current with new technologies.

Emerging Tech Trends and Libraries

How are emerging technology trends impacting libraries? Tech gurus Lrobot armaura Solomon and David Lee King are delivering a 4-part webinar series for Infopeople to explore this question.

  • Part 1: Laura Solomon kicked off the series in December 2015. She discussed Gartner’s Hype Cycle, Internet of Things, wearables, the evolution of social media, and more. You can listen here (one-hour).
  • Part 2: David Lee King presented the second session in the series. His session covered trends and tipping points, including mobile, games, smart machines – all through the lens of “What does this mean for the library?”. You can listen here (one-hour).
  • Part 3: David Lee King returned to host the third session. This time he covered maker spaces, digital media labs, co-working spaces, and more. You can listen here (one-hour).

Part 4 in the series will be presented by Laura Solomon on June 15, 2016. You can register here.

 

 

Big week for all (library) things net

The Electronic Frontier Foundation released yesterday  its 2014 report on Who Has Your Back –a quick, clean way to see which online company platforms protect user privacy to what degree. It’s essential reading and a good guiding document for discussing privacy issues, advocacy, concerns, and practices with your library community, including students, the general public, and library boards.

This week also saw the FCC hold hearings on how making regulatory changes that affect net neutrality might be received by stakeholders. Hey, you’re a stakeholder. You can review the hearings, the current outcome, and make a response by following the #NetNeutrality hashtag on Twitter. (That feed includes links to formal documents published by the FCC in the immediate wake of the hearings).

It’s also been just over a week since the Gates Foundation made its formal announcement that the long-standing program that gave many American, as well as worldwide, libraries their first internet connectivity possibility, the Global Libraries project, will wind to a close across the next three to five years. That’s another indication that we need to step up, as library service providers in the 21st century, to evaluate and advocate for what’s good for our communities and what our communities need to have assured as sacrosanct when it comes to online access, privacy, and best practices for government and for us.

What’s going ’round

The past month (and in almost any “past month”), tech media stories have been awash with a few high profile stories that cry out for library-level responses. The pair selected for highlighting here involve a collection-oriented concern and one related to community information needs.

The We Need Diverse Books Campaign became solidified and systematized across the past couple weeks, although the concerns it addresses have been real and compelling for a century. Major publishing houses, the work horses that supply our libraries with books for youth, have a lot of responsibilities: finding, editing, publishing promoting works of fiction and nonfiction comprise a gargantuan job, undertaken by those who work as editors, editorial assistants, agents and other proposal and manuscript readers, cover designers, packagers, sales jobbers, reviewers…and only then do new works reach the point of audience discovery, and individual reader enhancement or rejection.

When a panel planned for 2014’s Book Expo America was first revealed to be exclusively white and male, years of discontent with this long outmoded staging of how-we-show-kids-their-world erupted into a groundswell of activist author, editor, librarian, bookshop staff, and reader response. Social media, including most particularly Tumblr and Twitter, became the stage for days of concentrated demonstration, and helped to establish a presence of alternatives. To catch up with how swiftly such a demonstration of needs can foment, articulately and cogently, serves as an ancillary lesson for library staff who have been slow to credit social media with relevant and awesome power.

This story, then, offers two bottom lines: no matter what you think your community looks like/identifies with, they (and you, in service to that community) need diverse books; and you, in the position of learning quickly and authoritatively, need to engage in linking to what is happening in the publishing world, now that it can be altered in direction by skilled social mediators.

The second story is one that originates with the discovery of the devastating breadth of the Heartbleed bug, news of which began to reach the general public at the end of the first week of April. What has developed across the six weeks since this news broke is a secondary story that implicitly addresses us as library staffers: a month after Heartbleed’s reported presence and publicity about how to mitigate its damages at the personal online security level, a majority of American computer users were not taking the steps required to rid their online presence of this security flaw. That is where we need to step up our game, taking a proactive stance toward educating, coaching, and actively supporting good online hygiene in our communities, instead of waiting to be asked for guidance.

We can be information sources for our communities. However, doing the informing, doing information, is a far more powerful and valuable approach. And to take that on, we need to address our own never-ending need to know and understand how big news doesn’t happen in a silo: we have a role in connecting news and our community in ways that enhance and promote the community’s interests.