December Webinars

Looking for practical & free learning that you can participate in right at your desk? Please join us for one, two, or all three of these webinars in December!

Libraries and the people working in them help in so many ways. Join us for these  upcoming webinars and discover useful resources and strategies.

MINDSETWednesday – December 5
“School Readiness Webinar Series, Part 1: Growth Mindset”
This is the first webinar in a 4-part series focused on helping libraries use the Reimagining School Readiness Toolkit. Join us for this 90-minute webinar to learn more about what you can do to help support children’s growth mindset and persistence through challenge. For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=801&reset=1.

IMMIGRANTS

Tuesday – December 11
“Using USCIS Resources to Support Immigrants and Refugees in the Library”
The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services’ (USCIS) Office of Citizenship has developed a wealth of products and resources your library can use to help people gain information on how to become a U.S. citizen, prepare for the U.S. naturalization test and interview, and navigate life in the United States. Join us for this one-hour webinar to learn about Citizenship Corners, free products and resources, and other ways to help recently arrived immigrants and refugees. For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=810&reset=1.

EQUITYThursday – December 13
“We Know Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion are Important… Now What?”
It seems like everyone is talking about equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI), but what does it really mean to put these values into practice at your library? In this one-hour webinar, the presenters will a provide a “starter kit” for EDI training in libraries. For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=809&reset=1.


Webinars are free of charge. Pre-register by clicking on the Register Now button on the announcement page. If you pre-register, you will receive an email with the login link and a reminder email the day before the event. If you are unable to attend a live event, you can access the recorded version the day following the webinar. Check out our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived.

 

Libraries and Podcasting

what is a podcastWe’re approaching a long weekend and for many of us that means – road trip! If you’re like me, one of the best things about those highway hours is listening to podcasts. I’ve been known to spend a fair chunk of time curating just the right options for a family journey. And I know I’m not alone in my podcast fandom. Their popularity continues to steadily increase. According to the 2018 Infinite Dial Study by Edison Research and Triton Digital, 44% of Americans (age 12 and over) say they have listened to a podcast.

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Libraries not only help people find relevant podcasts, but they can use podcasts for engagement with their communities, too. In her upcoming Infopeople course about Community Engagement, instructor Barbara Alvarez suggests there are countless opportunities for libraries to create podcast series.

Some of her ideas include:

  • Storytelling with community members
    Partner with local historical societies or genealogy groups to interview and record stories from community members, including senior citizens, about memorable occurrences in the community.
  • Entrepreneurs
    Host an entrepreneur series in which you interview local business owners who decided to become their own boss. Ask about their story, what their recommendations are for people who would like to follow in their footsteps, and what the future is for entrepreneurship. (Take a look at an entrepreneur podcast series Barbara created as a Business Librarian).
  • Booktalks
    Encourage local organizations, businesses, and community members to participate in a monthly booktalk podcast in which you discuss a book (or movie or topic), and get a local expert’s (business owner or organization) input into how that theme relates to the community as a whole. (Barbara’s library hosts a monthly book discussion and has a blast doing it! Listen to their episodes).
  • Informational Interviews.
    Curious about a certain field, profession, topic, or theme? Create a podcast series exploring oddities, curiosities, and unknown people, places, and things in your community. (Barbara and a colleague hosted an informational series as part of the virtual conference called The Library OnConference. Listen here.)
  • Local happenings
    Partner with the Park District, Chamber of Commerce, local government, schools, etc. to talk about exciting events going on in the community, and how people can get involved. Interview community members about their participation, too.
  • Creative communities
    Use the podcast as a platform for local writers and creatives to share their poems, songs, stories, and more. Think of it as an “open mic night” on air.
  • Armchair travel
    If there are patrons at your library who enjoy traveling, ask if they are willing to share their experiences so fellow members of the community can travel from the comfort of their home.
  • Job seeker series
    Support the local job seeking network by partnering with job seeker programs or organizations to share best practices, tips and resources that job seekers can utilize during their career transition. This is also a great opportunity to highlight library resources and tools.

Did those examples get your creative juices flowing? We hope so! Using technology for community engagement is all about building new or stronger community relationships using virtual technology, spreading the library’s and the community’s message to a larger audience, particularly those who are unfamiliar with library and community resources, and showcasing aspects of the library and the community that may be overlooked or unknown.

And there’s more good news… you do not need fancy software or expensive equipment to create a podcast series. You can use your smartphone or tablet and free software!

Does your library create podcasts? Can you think of a potential podcast series for your library and community?

In Community Engagement: Building Connections with Technology, Barbara walks learners through process of creating podcasts and videos, too. She also helps learners discover how to broadcast live events, making it possible to share library events virtually. Additional information and registration are available at: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=785&reset=1.

Assessing Community Needs

The Lawrence (KS) Public Library had questions about their community! They wanted to identify gaps in information, resources, and services that are available to their community, and to better understand the library’s role in filling those gaps. Read more about their Community Needs Assessment in a case study created as part of the California Data Informed Public Library initiative.

lawrence public library cina

Has your library used data to make plans, decisions, and changes? We’re seeking additional Case Studies to share! Contact brenda (at) infopeople.org if interested.

 

Make a Plan for Learning

What will you learn in 2017? Have you set any professional learning goals? Plan On Monitor Shows Expectations

Creating a learning plan is something an individual, a team, or a community of practice can do. It is a way of communicating intentions and identifying action steps to be taken to achieve your learning goals. Achieving learning goals can make your work life more satisfying and it can ultimately lead to improved library services.

There are many different approaches to creating a learning plan, but this article will overview a simple three step process that may work for you.

  1. Reflect: What did you do in 2016? What did you learn? What changed in your community, organization, and department or with your position? Think more broadly, too, and also consider… How has the field changed? What new technologies, trends, or opportunities have you not yet explored? Consider these questions and critically think about your workplace performance and consider areas for growth. It may be useful to solicit input from peers or supervisors who are familiar with your job performance, too.
  2. Set Goals: Based upon your reflection, identify things you want or need to learn. Start by creating a long list of possibilities and then establish priorities. Looking at the strategic goals for your library, organization or community can help you determine the learning priorities that are most relevant. Discussions with your supervisor can also be key as you narrow down your list of learning possibilities. From your list, select 3-5 learning goals. Try to set goals that are ambitious, yet realistic.
  3. Identify Actions: For each goal, create an action plan. How will you achieve each learning goal? Will you take a course? Attend a webinar?  If so, we can help!
    • Infopeople’s Planned Training Calendar can help you identify learning opportunities.
    • If you want to receive email notices as courses and webinars are scheduled, you can sign up for the Infopeople training announcement list.
    • Having trouble finding a course or webinar that addresses your learning goals? Please use this form to make a training suggestion.
    • It’s critical that learning not stop at the end of the training. Applying what you have learned in your workplace is a vital action step to include in your plan. Infopeople training always emphasizes practical application.

Ready to start learning with us? Here are a few of our upcoming courses and webinars!

Online Courses (4 weeks, unless otherwise noted)
  • After School and Out-of-School Programming – Instructor: Lisa Shaia
  • Adult Literacy Programs – Instructor: Jane Salisbury
  • Technology Planning – Instructor: Diana Silveira
  • Widgets and Tweaks: Tools for spicing up old websites and blogs (2 week course) – Instructor: Rita Gavelis
  • Introduction to Library Management – Instructor: Anne Cain
  • Serving People with Mental Illness at Your Library – Instructor: Josh Berk
  • Developing Effective Library Partnerships – Instructor: Catherine Hakala-Ausperk
  • Beyond Cataloging: RDA – Instructor: Emily Nimsakont
  • Emotional Intelligence (Part 1) – Instructor: Catherine McHugh
  • Programs for Emerging Adults – Instructor: Audrey Barbakoff
  • All Work is Team Work (LSSC) – Instructor: Cheryl Gould
  • Customer Service Challenges- Instructor: Mary Ross
  • Supervisory Success – Instructor: Sarah Flowers
  • Staying on Top of Technology – Instructor: David Lee King
  • Re-Defining Safe at Work – Instructor: Catherine Hakala-Ausperk
Webinars (1 hour)
  • Historypin: Connecting Communities with Local History – Presenter(s): Kerry Young
  • What’s New in Children’s Literature 2017 – Presenter(s): Penny Peck
  • Informational Books for Storytime – Presenter(s): Penny Peck
  • What’s New in Young Adult Literature 2017 – Presenter(s): Michael Cart

If you would like to receive email notices as registration for these courses and webinars opens, please sign up for the Infopeople training announcement list.