Upcoming Webinars

Please join us for these upcoming FREE webinars!

website_accessibility

Introduction to Website Accessibility  Presented by: Laura Solomon

Wednesday, October 23, 2019 @noon Pacific Time/1 PM Mountain/2 PM Central/3 PM Eastern

Description: Are you concerned that your library’s website isn’t meeting accessibility standards? In this one-hour webinar, you’ll gain an understanding of which guidelines are used to measure website accessibility in the United States, and how to begin to evaluate your own library’s site for potential issues. We’ll also discuss some common pitfalls and things to avoid. Topics for this webinar include:

  • What accessibility means in a web context, and how it differs from web usability
  • Legal issues surrounding web accessibility and how these can affect libraries
  • National and international standards commonly used for accessibility evaluations, and which to use, when
  • An introduction to automated validators and what they can and cannot do
  • Actual code examples for both good and bad implementations of some common HTML elements

At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

  • Know what website accessibility is and why it matters, including from a legal standpoint
  • Learn of the two main standards used for website accessibility and when to apply them
  • Understand how automated validators work and what they can and cannot do
  • Learn several code examples, both good and bad, for increasing accessibility

This webinar will be of interest to: Staff responsible for websites or wanting to learn about web accessibility.

For a complete description and to REGISTER, go to: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=867&reset=1

popup civics lab

Facilitating Civic Engagement with Pop-Up Programming

Presented by: Amy Holcomb and Christine Goertz

Wednesday November 6, 2019 @noon Pacific Time

Description: In late summer of 2016, Skokie (IL) Public Library created a Civic Lab–a mobile, pop-up initiative to increase public discussion and civic literacy among library patrons of all ages. In this webinar Christine Goertz and Amy Holcomb, two members of the Civic Lab team, will discuss the background of the Civic Lab, strategies in developing civic literacy opportunities across multiple departments, and the four types of pop-up events that make up the majority of Civic Lab appearances. Additionally, they will cover why civic engagement is inherent in library services as well as the lessons learned from three years of civic literacy programming.

At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

  • Be able to articulate and advocate for the role of the public library as a convener of civic engagement opportunities in the community
  • Be able to identify strategies and topics for engaging patrons in thought-provoking ideas and dialogue beyond traditional programming
  • Be able to identify and engage library staff at all levels in civic engagement initiatives across the library

This webinar will be of interest to: librarians, programming staff, information specialists, directors and assistant directors in public libraries

 

For a complete description and to REGISTER, go to: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=866&reset=1

____________________________________________

Infopeople webinars are free of charge. If you pre-register (use the links above), you will receive an email with login link and a reminder email the day before the event. If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day after the webinar.

Check our webinar archive listing at:  http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

Key website for usability

The Government Domain column in LLRX.com “The Cream of the Federal Web Site Crop” by Peggy Garvin discusses the best of them and why usability is so important to having a good website. She ends the column with a site recommendation “that may restore your faith in government websites.”

Usability.gov from the Department of Health and Human Services is a “resource for designing usable, useful, and accessible web sites and user interfaces.” The site began as a project of the National Cancer Institute to find evidence-based usability guidelines so that they could make cancer information easily available to the public. The product, Usability.gov, is available to the public as well as federal web developers. Several of the World Usability Day panelists remarked that a plus to working in government is that they can “steal,” or adapt, the work of their federal colleagues for their own projects, and agencies actively share their solutions within the federal community.