Check Out These April Webinars

In the spring, a library staff member’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of learning.

Apologies to Tennyson for that very un-poetic appropriation of his verse… but we are excited about these three lovely learning opportunities in April (which is National Poetry Month!).

April 4th: Celebrating Diversity & Multiculturalism through Crafts

createWith presenters Kimberli Buckley and Dunyau Maqsoudi-Moreno on Thursday, April 4, 2019 @noon Pacific Time

Celebrating diversity means being accepting of all people, regardless of their race, culture, or religion. Learning about different cultural aspects offers unique and new experiences for children. Hands-on craft activities provide an interactive and fun way to introduce children to the concept of diversity and multiculturalism.

In this webinar, we will define diversity and multiculturalism, cultural appropriateness, and highlight crafts and activities that will help teach children to respect and celebrate the differences in all people. By merging diversity and equity into our library programming we can build cultural relevance into any craft program.

For a complete description and to REGISTER: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=830&reset=1

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April 9th: Free Tools for Working with Graphics and the Web

design
With presenter Laura Solomon on Tuesday, April 9, 2018 @noon Pacific Time

Does your job involve working with graphics, social media, or websites? Join Laura Solomon as she explores tools to help you make your online content more creative and appealing. Laura will discuss:

  • Tools for working with and creating video and animations
  • Tools for creating social media content
  • Tools to help with fonts and colors
  • Tools that can assist with website-related work

For a complete description and to REGISTER: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=832&reset=1

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April 23rd: New Books for Storytime

ReadWith presenter Penny Peck on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 @noon Pacific Time

Are you looking for new picture books to re-energize your storytimes? This webinar will focus on new picture books that will engage the storytime audience, including books that invite audience participation, books based on songs and nursery rhymes, books that promote preliteracy skills and kindergarten readiness, and websites useful to storytime planning.

For a complete description and to REGISTER: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=834&reset=1

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Webinars are free of charge. You can pre-register by clicking on the Register Now button on the announcement page. If you pre-register, then you will receive an email with login link and a reminder email the day before the event.

If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar.  Check out our archive listing at:  http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

Upcoming webinars in March!

training puzzle

Infopeople has a busy Spring schedule of webinars coming up in March. Topics range from immigration resources to crisis communication – basically something for everybody! All webinars start at noon Pacific and last for one hour. Oh, and they’re free!

Here is the complete list for March:

If you miss these (or any) live events, you can always find the archive on Infopeople’s archived webinars page.

December Webinars

Looking for practical & free learning that you can participate in right at your desk? Please join us for one, two, or all three of these webinars in December!

Libraries and the people working in them help in so many ways. Join us for these  upcoming webinars and discover useful resources and strategies.

MINDSETWednesday – December 5
“School Readiness Webinar Series, Part 1: Growth Mindset”
This is the first webinar in a 4-part series focused on helping libraries use the Reimagining School Readiness Toolkit. Join us for this 90-minute webinar to learn more about what you can do to help support children’s growth mindset and persistence through challenge. For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=801&reset=1.

IMMIGRANTS

Tuesday – December 11
“Using USCIS Resources to Support Immigrants and Refugees in the Library”
The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services’ (USCIS) Office of Citizenship has developed a wealth of products and resources your library can use to help people gain information on how to become a U.S. citizen, prepare for the U.S. naturalization test and interview, and navigate life in the United States. Join us for this one-hour webinar to learn about Citizenship Corners, free products and resources, and other ways to help recently arrived immigrants and refugees. For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=810&reset=1.

EQUITYThursday – December 13
“We Know Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion are Important… Now What?”
It seems like everyone is talking about equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI), but what does it really mean to put these values into practice at your library? In this one-hour webinar, the presenters will a provide a “starter kit” for EDI training in libraries. For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=809&reset=1.


Webinars are free of charge. Pre-register by clicking on the Register Now button on the announcement page. If you pre-register, you will receive an email with the login link and a reminder email the day before the event. If you are unable to attend a live event, you can access the recorded version the day following the webinar. Check out our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived.

 

November Webinars

Looking for practical & free learning that you can participate in right at your desk? Please join us for one, two, three, or all four of these webinars in November!

Libraries and the people working in them help in so many ways. Join us for these  upcoming webinars and discover useful resources and strategies.

citizenship

Thursday – November 1, 2018
“Free Online U.S. Citizenship Course” Does your library provide support to adult immigrants who want to pursue U.S. citizenship and need help studying for the naturalization interview? USA Learns Citizenship is a free course that helps immigrants prepare for all aspects of the naturalization interview. Learn how your library can use the course to help immigrants prepare for their citizenship test.For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=799&reset=1.

esl

Wednesday – November 14, 2018
“Free Online English as a Second Language Courses”
Is your library looking for ways to help people learn beginning and intermediate English as a second language (ESL)? USA Learns has three ESL courses that incorporate video lessons and thousands of learning activities to teach English in an effective and interactive way. Learn how your library can utilize the courses to help immigrants improve basic language skills.For more information and to register: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=800&reset=1.

meaningful workThursday – Nov 15, 2018 “Encore Career Search Strategies: Help Your Patrons Find Their Way to Meaningful Work”
As library staff it can be very rewarding to help your patrons on the challenging path of (re)entering the job market as a “mature worker.” We can help older patrons compete successfully for jobs by steering them toward resources that match their needs, and by helping them find (economical) ways to develop new job search skill. This webinar will give you information and resources to help patrons bridge the gap in knowledge and skills. For a complete description and to register go to: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=805&reset=1.

writeWednesday – Nov 28, 2018 “How to Write More Effective Email and Web Content”
Communication connects us to one another and is at the heart of everything we do. In this webinar, we’ll offer specific guidelines that will help you communicate more effectively in an age in which we read most of our content on a screen. We’ll look at before and after examples, and attendees will receive a list of resources for learning more. For a complete description and to register go to: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=798&reset=1.


Webinars are free of charge. Pre-register by clicking on the Register Now button on the announcement page. If you pre-register, you will receive an email with the login link and a reminder email the day before the event. If you are unable to attend a live event, you can access the recorded version the day following the webinar. Check out our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived.

Ten Tips for Library Grants

Stephanie Gerding, grants expert and an author of the best selling book, Winning Grants: A How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians from ALA Editions, is teaching an updated version of her popular Infopeople course, Library Grants 101.grant process cycle

As a course preview, Stephanie shared her top ten tips for library grants with us!

  1. Plan Ahead
    Strategic plans are a grant writing time saver and a key to success! There are two major reasons to have a strategic plan. The first is to best serve your community. The second reason is that funders like plans (and some require them). The main components for grant proposals and the inspiration for grant projects are easily found in a well developed strategic plan.  Libraries with plans have much greater prospects for a successful future and are able to contribute to their community’s biggest aspirations, which is what funders are striving for as well. Strategic planning is about being proactive, rather than reactive…not responding to the RFPs, but starting with your library’s mission and vision to create the desired future based on the true needs of your community members. It is important to know what you want to accomplish and who will be helped.
  2. Focus on the People
    Your proposal should tell the story of the people that will be helped. It is never about the “stuff” you will get (money, technology, buildings, etc.) but about the people. Funders want to help people, not buy things. In library work, we are passionate about what we do and we change people’s lives every day through our programs and services. Make it clear to the funder how your library grant project will impact your community members.
  3. Share Your Grant Goals
    Tell everyone you know that you are looking for a grant and discuss your grant project. Make sure your library staff, board members, and volunteers know about your grant goals and can talk about them as well. You never know where a great contact might come from or who might know of a great opportunity.
  4. Develop Relationships
    Funders aren’t ATMs, they are real people, just like you and me (really! I’ve been on the funder side of things!). Contact potential funders to clarify your questions, discuss your project, and determine their interest in your project. Develop relationships with the contact people. If your project is not a match with a particular funder, ask if they know of other potential funders who would be a better match.
  5. Find Library Grant Opportunities
    I started a shortcut to finding library grants on a free website that I have co-authored since 2005 (librarygrants.blogspot.com). I include the deadline, a brief description, and a link to more information. To save you time in your grant seeking, I verify with every grant opportunity that libraries of some type are eligible to apply. In the Infopeople course, I share my top funders for library grants plus another big tip for finding grant opportunities.
  6. Demonstrate Impact
    Build evaluation into your grant planning so that you can demonstrate impact to your funders and to your community. Evaluation of grant projects can help demonstrate how your library supports your community infrastructure and your community’s future.
  7. Save the Best for Last
    The most important part of your grant proposal may be the proposal abstract or summary as it serves as the first impression and can be critical to the success of the proposal. It may be carefully scrutinized to determine if the rest of the proposal should even be considered, so it needs to be able to stand on its own. Even though it is often the first section of a proposal, it should be written last to make sure it contains all elements of your grant proposal.
  8. Balance Facts with Emotional Appeal
    Decisions to give (like most human decisions) are emotional. Facts by themselves are not persuasive, and do not motivate people to give. Provide fact-based, verifiable data, but include the passion you feel for the people you serve. But don’t be afraid to include emotion with your facts and data. After all, you are communicating with people you share values with and you want to persuade them to champion your project while fulfilling their cause. Tell the story of the people who will be helped.
  9. Follow the Guidelines
    When completing grant proposals or award applications, follow the guidelines explicitly and answer all the questions. Make it easy for the grant reviewer to find the information requested by following the same format and headings as the application, and your proposal will be easier to read. The reviewer may have hundreds of applications to read, so don’t let yours be disqualified due to a technicality.
  10. Be Positive
    A positive attitude yields positive results. Some libraries get so mired down by budget, staff, and/or space shortages that their grant applications seem like an airing of grievances rather than evidence of needs with plans for creative solutions. Although you need to demonstrate the reasons your library requires the funding, make sure that the application’s overall message is encouraging and perhaps even inspirational. The funder has a vision how they can help make the world a better place, and your library has the means to help fulfill their vision. Remember to be grateful to the funder, and to all the staff that support the grant. When you’ve received funding, celebrate any success and always give recognition where it is due.

Stephanie adds, “Libraries do change lives, and we need to make sure that funders and supporters know that libraries positively impact communities. There is a saying that luck—and success—is what occurs when preparation meets opportunity. No one is ever 100 percent successful, but libraries have a lot of advantages in the grant world, so keep writing those grants!”

Information and registration for the course are at https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?id=792&reset=1.